Skip to main content
scroll to top

Watershed Assistance Grants

Grants administered through NHDES assist in addressing nonpoint source pollution.

Watershed Assistance Section 319 Grants

Solicitation for projects to address nonpoint source (NPS) pollution through the implementation of watershed-based plans.

Each year NHDES solicits projects to address nonpoint source (NPS) pollution through the implementation of watershed-based plans in priority watersheds. Projects must comprehensively address NPS problems, and must have a quantitative way to assess progress and determine success. The watershed-based plan must have a clear water quality goal and include the nine, minimum elements (a) through (i) required by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Funded projects must make reasonable progress toward achieving the water quality goal established in the watershed-based plan.

NHDES' Watershed Assistance Section has released the 2022 Watershed Assistance Grants' Pre-proposal request for proposals (RFP) to support local initiatives to restore impaired waters or protect high quality waters. Pre-proposals are due by 4 PM, September 17, 2021.

 

For more information, contact: 

Funds for this grant are appropriated through the US Environmental Protection Agency under Section 319 of the Clean Water Act. 

 

CONTACT  

 

Water Quality Planning 604(b) Grants

Solicitation for regional planning commission projects that will use planning dollars to address nonpoint source (NPS) pollution or other water quality concerns.

Water Quality Planning 604(b) grants are available to Regional Planning Commissions and/or the Connecticut River Joint Commissions for water quality planning purposes. The 2022 Request for Letter of Intent (LOI) is now available. An approximate total award amount of $64,000 is available. All LOIs are due by 4 PM, September 17, 2021.

2022 Water Quality Planning 604(b) Letter of Intent  

Section 604(b) of the EPA Clean Water Act requires funds to be allocated to regional planning entities for conducting water quality planning, including: 

  1. Identifying the most cost effective and locally acceptable facility and nonpoint source (NPS) measures to meet and maintain water quality standards;  
  2. Developing an implementation plan to obtain state and local financial and regulatory commitments to implement water quality plans;  
  3. Determining the nature, extent, and causes of water quality problems in the state; and  
  4. Determining those publicly owned treatment works which should be constructed, taking into account the relative degree of effluent reduction attained and the consideration of alternatives to such construction.  

Other eligible projects that address the above water quality concerns may include but are not limited to: developing corridor management plans for designated rivers; conducting monitoring to address specific water quality concerns; planning stormwater retrofits to address water quality impairments; green infrastructure projects that manage wet weather to maintain or restore natural hydrology; working with municipalities committed to adopting specific model ordinances and/or meeting regulations (MS4 Permits) to address priority water quality planning concerns; and/or developing watershed-based plans in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria requiring nine key elements (a) through (i) for watershed-based plans.  

 

CONTACT