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Rising Tides Photo Contest

Date: January 10, 2022

The New Hampshire Coastal Adaptation Workgroup is a collaboration of 30+ organizations, including NHDES, working to ensure that New Hampshire’s coastal watershed communities are resourceful, ready and resilient to extreme weather and long-term climate change.

Now a regular event, the Rising Tides photo contest aims to raise awareness of New Hampshire’s rising tides. Formerly known as the King Tide Photo Contest, the rebranded initiative aims to raise awareness about sea-level rise and the increasing frequency of high tide flooding in New Hampshire. The most recent contest received over 60 eligible submissions. Members of the public were invited to vote online for their favorite submissions in each of four contest categories. The following submissions received the most votes in each category and are hereby declared the winners of the 2021 Rising Tides Contest.

Contest winners have been notified and will receive a $100 gift card to a local restaurant of their choosing.
Please direct all questions to Nathalie DiGeronimo, Resilience Project Manager with the NHDES Coastal Program, at nathalie.m.digeronimo@des.nh.gov or (603) 559-0029.

HIGH TIDE FLOODING – ATLANTIC COAST

People, places and things impacted by the high tide flooding in New Hampshire’s Atlantic Coast communities:
Hampton, Hampton Falls, New Castle, North Hampton, Portsmouth, Rye, and Seabrook

coastal properties have ocean water coming up to their foundations

Futuristic Reflections: The properties of this little community have become one with the Atlantic Ocean during King Tide, making daily life a bit more challenging. Credit: Ned Harvey / 2021 Rising Tides Photo Contest, High Tide Flooding – Atlantic Coast Winner

 

HIGH TIDE FLOODING – GREAT BAY

People, places and things impacted by the high tide flooding in New Hampshire’s Great Bay communities:
Dover, Durham, Exeter, Greenland, Madbury, Newfields, Newington, Newmarket, Rollinsford, and Stratham

a red brick sidewalk is covered in rising waters

Follow the Red Brick Road: Vulnerability of Durham Landing. King tides don't just affect the coast, they have a disruptive effect on the bays and rivers as well. Credit: Jennifer Dubois / 2021 Rising Tides Photo Contest, High Tide Flooding – Great Bay Winner

 

COMMUNITY RESILIENCE – ATLANTIC COAST

Community resilience in in New Hampshire’s Atlantic Coast communities:
Hampton Falls, New Castle, North Hampton, Portsmouth, Rye and Seabrook

a wave crashes against a concrete barrier

The seawall in Hampton helps protect Route 1A and nearby businesses from high tide flooding.  But, even with the seawall, high tides, especially those that coincide with storm events, can breach the wall, leading to localized flooding and hazardous road conditions. Credit: Melissa Brogle / 2021 Rising Tides Photo Contest, Community Resilience – Atlantic Coast Winner

 

COMMUNITY RESILIENCE – GREAT BAY

Community resilience in in New Hampshire’s Great Bay communities:
Dover, Durham, Exeter, Greenland, Madbury, Newfields, Newington, Newmarket, Rollinsford, and Stratham Hampton,

sea water encroaches on salt water marshes during high tide

Sea level rise is detrimental to our salt marsh habitat – one of the most productive ecosystems in the world. But innovative stabilization techniques like this "living shoreline" at Wagon Hill Farm in Durham are helping this natural shoreline habitat survive as the waters rise. Credit: Alaina Rogers / 2021 Rising Tides Photo Contest, Community Resilience – Great Bay Winner